Introduction

*

Doug Banner, M.ED. , Storyteller

*********

Performances, Workshops, Keynotes

.

Doug Banner is the Flow Process Team Leader for The Flow Project where he directs and coordinates data collection and processing, www.theflowproject.org . Professional Storyteller, Educator, Community activist, musician and artist Doug works to facilitate the change processes at all levels of society. He helps people learn how the intellectual/emotional stories we tell promote or prevent positive growth personally and collectively and explore how the “Myths of Our Times” influence our models of leadership and community action. An educator for 30 years, Doug has studied the art and science of storytelling as the core foundation in social and cultural development and positive change. Formerly an elementary school teacher and principal, Doug is now adjunct faculty at Western Washington University. In addition to performing as a storyteller and musician, Doug presents his work and the work of the Flow Project for organizations such as the Compassion Action Network www.compassionactionnetwork.org , the Association of Transpersonal Psychology, Organizations Systems Renewal at Seattle University www.osr-nw.org , and Kinship Conservation Fellows www.kinshipfellows.org .  Doug holds an Associate degree in engineering, a MEd. with endorsements in Science, and has done graduate studies in research biology and ecology. Doug is a co-founder of the Bellingham Compassion Movement, co-founder and Executive Director of the Bellingham Storytellers Guild, Washington State Liaison to the National Storytelling Network, and works internationally with the NuWa International Peace Delegation www.ethnohtec.org.

Awards: 2000 Bellingham Mayor’s Arts Award, for developing storytelling in the Bellingham community; 1995 WWU Woodring College of Education Award for Professional Excellence, for co-developing a professional development school for teacher training; 1991 Whatcom County Conservation Teacher of the Year, for developing a comprehensive, integrated, field-based science education program and environmental study site in Ferndale, WA. Publications: “Guilds, Communities Work Together: The Bellingham Storytellers Guild”, in Storytelling Magazine: A Publication of the National Storytelling Network. November/December 2009, Volume 21, Issue 5: “Voices of the Ancestors Oral History Project”, July/August 2007, Volume 19 Issue 4: “Connecting Translated Stories Through Historical Perspective”, November/ December 2007, Volume 19 Issue 6.

.

Audience Comments

*

-       “From Doug Banner I learned how to appropriately use a prop in a story without taking away focus from the story itself.”
*

-       “Doug Banner was the second storyteller and he was my favorite because of the life he brought to his two stories. There was always a little bit of humor and mischief tucked away behind his eyes while he was telling his stories.”
*
-       “He has a knack for eye contact during those stories that really draws you into the story. It makes his performance seem more conversational and less of a division between him and the audience. He breaks through that barrier.”
*
-       “One thing that stuck out to me was how his voice was loud and clear so that the whole audience could understand him. Even though I was sitting off to the side, I could feel that he was paying just as much attention to me as everyone else in the audience.”
*
-       “Doug Banner can make 15 minutes disappear extremely quickly!”
*
-       “Doug has a great voice; it’s soothing, but not sleep-inducing.”
*
-       “You could see it in his eyes how much he himself cared for this story and that radiated out into the audience.”
*
-       “His imagery techniques accompanied with detailed gestures, inspired me to think about description and imagery as two elements that complement each other.”
*
-       “The biggest thing that stayed with me after he left was his presence. I felt as though the whole time that he was telling the story that he was talking to me directly. He captured my attention with his eye contact and his tone, and speed. It was almost as though we were just sitting down having coffee together.”
*
All comments are printed with permission.